Thursday, April 20, 2017

The Galleria Italia in the Art Gallery of Ontario


With a range of experience in energy and real estate, Romeo DiBattista Jr. heads both Brovi Investments and The Recycling Depot (Maple) Inc. Romeo DiBattista Jr. is also a supporter of the arts in his community and was a founding donor of the Galleria Italia in the Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) in Toronto. 

In 2002, art collector Ken Thomson donated 2,000 artworks to AGO, which sparked a four-year architectural renovation and expansion of the gallery by famed architect Frank Gehry. The Galleria Italia, a large showcase of art made of glass and wood, spans one of Toronto’s city blocks and became a defining feature of the renovation project. The critically acclaimed renovation, called Transformation AGO, began officially in 2004 and was completed in 2008. 

The Galleria Italia got its name from an innovative fundraiser headed by AGO board member Tony Gagliano. He brought together a $10 million donation from 20 of Toronto’s Italian families who named the space in honor of their homeland.

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Habitat for Humanity and Lowe's Build More Than 1,000 Homes in 2016


Romeo DiBattista Jr. serves as the CEO of Brovi Investments Limited, a real estate investment company based in Toronto, Ontario. Apart from his work life, Romeo DiBattista Jr. supports the efforts of Habitat for Humanity.

During 2016, Habitat for Humanity and Lowe’s Home Improvement partnered to provide homes for more than 1,000 families. The two organizations have worked together for years toward the goal of helping families achieve home ownership. During a December event in Fort Worth, Texas, Habitat and Lowe's spearheaded an effort to restore 58 homes in celebration of passing the 1,000-home mark in 2016. 

Throughout the year, Lowe’s contributed $4.5 million to Habitat for Humanity and provided nearly 4,000 volunteers to help build or revitalize houses. In comments about the achievement, Habitat’s deputy director of corporate and foundation relations, Colleen Finn Ridenhour, spoke on the importance of stable homes for families and reaffirmed Habitat’s commitment to helping bring homes to people in need.

Thursday, March 2, 2017

Different Types of Skiing




Successful entrepreneur Romeo DiBattista, Jr., splits his time between serving as the CEO of Brovi Investments Ltd. and the president and CEO of The Recycling Depot. Both companies are based in Canada and focus on real estate investment and waste and recycling, respectively. Outside of work, Romeo DiBattista, Jr., enjoys skiing. When most people talk about skiing, they discuss the sport as if there is a single type of skiing. However, there are actually several types that enthusiasts enjoy, some of the most common of which are discussed below:

- Alpine. Also known as downhill skiing, alpine skiing is one of the most basic types of skiing. It is usually lift-serviced, and the ski runs are well groomed. Alpine skis are generally wider than other types of skis, and the poles are shorter.

- Mogul. Although this is a type of alpine skiing, mogul skiing focuses primarily on skiing over large mounds of snow. Mogul skiers stay extremely focused as they move through the mounds, and they utilize rotary movements instead of traditional carving motions.

- Aerial. Rather than simply skiing down a hill, aerial skiers descend toward a ramped jump. After going off the jump, they perform different twists and somersaults before landing. Aerial skis allow skiers to move backwards and forwards and are not accompanied by poles.

- Backcountry. Typically enjoyed by more experienced skiers, backcountry or all-mountain skiing consists of some of a mountain’s most challenging runs. This type of skiing requires a solid understanding of several technical skills and the use of “fat skis,” which are wide under the foot and at both ends.

Friday, February 17, 2017

Advice for Your First Day on a Habitat for Humanity Building Site


Romeo DiBattista, Jr., functions as the president and CEO of The Recycling Depot in Vaughan, Ontario. Moreover, Romeo DiBattista, Jr., supports Habitat for Humanity, a non-profit that renovates and builds homes for people in need. Volunteering for the organization usually means that you will spend time at a construction site, so it is important that you anticipate that eventuality.

Although Habitat for Humanity doesn’t require volunteers to bring anything other than their willingness to learn and work, you’re welcome to bring your own tools. However, you will need to dress appropriately for the work and weather. Avoid wearing jewelry, as it could get lost onsite, and be wary of baggy clothing, as it constitutes a hazard around machinery.

As for the jobs you will do, they range from demolition and unloading materials to painting. Don’t be afraid to ask questions, especially if you have no construction experience. Don’t feel like you need to complete a task with which you are uncomfortable. You can always ask your crew leader to reassign you.

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

St Michael's Hospital Foundation's Celebration Pages